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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Northsea KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source OTTO
type D
volume
material
dead 7
link

After being struck by lightning about 200 miles for the coast of Ghana, the 1976 built 32,290 dwt products tanker Northsea was set on fire and then sank. Out of a crew of 29, only 22 survived.


source MAREUD
type A
volume
material
dead 7
link

Suezmax and a supply ship have rescued 22 crew from a burning products tanker off Nigeria, but four bodies have been recovered and three men are missing. The vessel, named as the 18,000-gt North Sea, was in ballast 120 miles south-west of Lagos on Tuesday when it was spotted by the 159,000–dwt Teekay-owned tanker Toledo Spirit (built 2005), which alerted the UK coastguard at Falmouth via satellite. Toledo Spirit took 21 crew off liferafts after heading to the ship and a supply ship named as Brago picked up another crewman from the water. But it also brought on board four bodies. The missing include the vessel's master. North Sea may have been struck by lightning in an electrical storm, the UK coastguard said. Colin Sturman, area operations manager at Falmouth Coastguard said: "Search and rescue facilities are very limited in this part of the world. "We strive to provide a service to the mariner both within our waters and also to anyone in distress internationally utilising the technology that we have available to us."


source Graphic Ghana
type A
volume
material
dead 7
link

Lightning has killed six Ghanaian sailors and their Ukrainian captain off the Atlantic Coast of Benin. The six are Henry Ebow Crentsil, leader of the ratings, Akontey Francis, welder, Robert Aryee, seaman, Enoch Mark Eshun, seaman, Samuel Odai Adjetey, seaman, and Ekey Robert, steward. The bodies of Aryee, Eshun, Adjetey and Ekey have been retrieved but those of the Ukrainian captain, identified as Nasonov Volodymr, Crentsil and Akontey are still missing. Twenty-two of the crew, comprising 19 Ghanaians, two Ukrainians and one Romanian, however, survived the tragedy which occurred last Tuesday when lightning struck the Cambodia-registered oil tanker 200 nautical miles from the coast as a result of a storm which also swept through Ghana the same day. The 30,000-tonne oil tanker, MT North Sea, owned by Atlantic Oil Maritime S.A., with 29 crew members on board, had finished offloading oil from Nigeria onto another vessel when it was struck by the lightning. Speaking to the Daily Graphic in Tema, the Harbour Master, Captain Victor Jonah, said on Wednesday he had a distress call on the disaster from the agent for the vessel, Atlas Services Limited. He said a Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority tug, the Manhean, was, therefore, sent out to rescue the sailors. Captain Jonah said a sister vessel of the tanker, the MT April, was called to convey the survivors and the four retrieved bodies to meet the tug which, in turn, conveyed them to the port. He said the police were informed about the accident and the dead were conveyed to the Police Hospital, while the 22 survivors were sent to the Caiquo Hospital in Tema for medical attention. Captain Jonah said the Ukrainian and Romanian survivors had been put in some hotels in Tema, awaiting documentation to be flown home, while the 19 Ghanaian survivors had also been given accommodation to overcome the trauma before they would be sent home. The Port Captain of Atlas Services Limited, Captain Seth Aboagye, who called at the offices of the Daily Graphic in Accra, confirmed the incident. According to him, the parent company of Atlantic Services Limited, known as Atlantic Oil Maritime S.A. based in Greece, received a distress message from Lloyd’s Casualty Department, an insurance company in the United Kingdom which monitors the movement of ships with insurance policy with it, that thunder and lightning had struck the vessel, resulting in the death of some members of its crew. He said the survivors were initially picked by another vessel, the Toledo Spirit, before arrangements were made to send another vessel, the M/T April, to bring them to Tema. According to Captain Aboagye, the Ukrainian captain and two other Ghanaians whose bodies were yet to be retrieved were affected by an explosion i which occurred as a result of the lightning and thunder. He said the remaining four persons who died were believed to have been trapped by fenders. Captain Aboagye described the incident as painful and sad and advised the families of the victims to contact Atlas Services Limited for any additional information concerning their relatives.


source CTX
type D
volume Y
material
dead 7
link

This is a wild one. Equasis and MSI call the Northsea a vegetable oil tanker; but at 30,000 dwt and lightering oil that's clearly not true. This ship is a 1976 built pre-Marpol single hull trading way past the single hull deadline. The veg-oil category is almost certainly just a way of avoiding scrutiny. Apparently in the intra-Nigerian trade, pretty much anything goes with the proper baksheesh.

Ship switched from Panama to Cambodian flag in 2005. at which time Lloyds delisted. Equasis has no record of any Class since then. As of 2010-02-22, no record of this killer casualty in Gisis. As the above entries show, many sources call this ship the North Sea.

Given all the other irregularities, it is a good chance that the Northsea was not inerted. Also a decent chance that the lightning story is not true. Even if true, lightning will have little effect on a properly inerted tanker.

CTX knows of no economic reason for reverse lightering in this area. The explosion must have come just at or after the end of the STS transfer. The Northsea still had fenders along side. And both the Brago and the Toledo Spirit responded suspiciously quickly. CTX would not be surprised if the Brago was standing by to take the fenders, What else would a offshore supply boat be doing in this area? And it sounds like the Toledo Spirit may be the ship that received the Northsea's cargo. If not, why didn't that ship respond? If yes, why didn't the Toledo Spirit say so?