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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Ocean Victory KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 3
source SN
type A
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Less than two weeks after the loss of the ore carrier Giant Step off Kashima, heavy weather has brought about the grounding of two large bulkers at the same Japanese port. Ocean Longevity’s 175,000dwt Ocean Victory ran aground just outside the breakwater yesterday afternoon after discharging part of its 170,000t ore cargo, loaded in South Africa. The vessel’s master is reported to have decided to move the vessel away from the terminal halfway through discharging as a precaution against strong winds and high waves from a passing depression. Later, at around 2000 local time, the Daiichi Chuo Kisen-operated Panama-flag Ellida Ace, carrying 160,000 tonnes of iron ore from Canada, ran aground close to the northern end of Kashima breakwater. All 24 crew of the Ocean Victory and 20 Filipino seamen from Ellida Ace were airlifted by Japan Coast Guard (JCG) helicopters. JCG sources confirmed that all the rescued crew were uninjured. Tugs were standing by, but sea conditions continued to hamper refloating efforts. At midday GMT today the Ocean Victory was reported to be stable, but some of its ballast tanks and cargo holds were flooded. The vessel had not spilled oil but water leaking from the cargo holds had been discoloured by cargo. The Ellida Ace was described as “stable but with a 5 degree list to port”. No oil spill has occurred, but the ship's bow continued to be awash, and was being battered by the swell. Operators reported that the vessel had about 330 tons of heavy fuel on board and that a salvage tug was due to arrive to commence salvage efforts tomorrow.


source Hong Kong Investigation Report
type C
volume
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1.1 At about 1519 (local time) on 24 October 2006, the Hong Kong registered bulk carrier Ocean Victory hit against the northern extremity of the South Breakwater and later ran aground in the position of 35° 56.00’N, 140° 42.68’E at Kashima in Japan. The vessel was departing from the port with a view to seeking shelter from atrocious weather caused by a depression. The weather was overcast and rainy. The wind was northerly at force 10 and the visibility was about 4 cables. The starboard bottom of Ocean Victory sustained considerable damages with cargo holds No.5, No.6, No.9 and the engine room flooded with sea water. The crew members were rescued by a helicopter to shore on 25 October 2006. No casualties and oil pollution were reported. Although attempts were made to refloat the vessel by a salvage company, the vessel broke into halves on 27 December 2006. 1.2 The investigation revealed that the accident was caused by atrocious weather due to depression with associated winds of force 10 i.e. severe tropical storm. The grounding could have been avoided if the vessel left the berth to seek shelter outside the port at an early stage. 2. Lessons 2.1 Masters should obtain the latest weather information and liaise with the agent and port authority with a view to seeking shelter from atrocious weather caused by depression or typhoon at an early stage.


source CTX
type C
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Photos shows the ship headed west pushed down on the south breakwater. She appears to have been pretty light at the time. Note that most of the damage is aft.

The Japan Seaman's Union says both ships were berthed and discharging "when ordered out".

The Hong Kong entry is the summary of the investigation report. The full report is not yet available as the case is "under legal proceedings" In the summary, there is no mention of a poorly designed port. No mention of the fact that this very large, low powered, single screw bulk carrier has nil low speed maneuverability. (CTX does not know what power plant the Ocean Victory had, but most bulk carriers of this size are fitted with a MAN 6S70MC optimistically rated at 16,860 KW at 91 RPM.) As the ship got pushed down on the rocks by the northerly wind, the master had only the rudder to work with. But going port helm meant the stern had to go starboard. That is why the ship the breakwater with the aft part of the hull. Twin screw --- with enough power --- would have allowed to turn his bow north without moving the stern south. More ballast would have helped as well.