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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Alexandros T KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source Philippine news report
type A
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dead
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The six Filipino seamen who survived a harrowing shipwreck off the coast of South Africa last May 3 have now returned home to tell of their harrowing experience. The seafarers arrived from South Africa aboard an Emirates Airways flight via Dubai, United Arab Emirates. They were escorted by their manning company crewing manager Capt. German Mendez The seamen- Sherie Montano, Allan Omol, Elizer Paulino, Aljess Miranda, Antonio Vergara, and Lee Alemanya were all smiles after eventually arriving on the flight which was delayed for almost 20 hours because of the strong winds brought by tropical storm "Caloy." Omol, who is the highest ranking personnel among the survivors, spoke in behalf of the group. He recounted that their ship, the bulk carrier "MV Alexandros T," was sailing some 300 miles off of the coast of Port Elizabeth in South Africa and on its way to China from Brazil when they encountered heavy seas. According to Omol, at 8 a.m. on May 3, he heard a loud explosion underneath the ship which was followed by a strong vibration. He immediately went to the engine room to check and was surprised to find out that everyone in "Cargo Hold 6" were busy pumping out water. Omol, whose shift wasn't due to start until noon, went back to his cabin to rest as everything seemed to be under control. By the time Omol reported to work at 12 noon, the ship was already listing Port and he saw most of the crew members pumping out the water from Cargo Holds 6, 7, and 8. At around 6 p.m., the crew was ordered to don life vests and report to their assigned life boats for a possible evacuation. During that time, the swells in the Indian Ocean got bigger and bigger and battered the ailing ship. At around 9 p.m., an extremely big wave hit the ship which washed the five seamen (all except Montano) off the boat and into the rough sea. Just 10 seconds after the crew were washed overboard, Omol recounted that they saw the big ship snap in the middle and immediately sank to the bottom of the ocean. The five seafarers held on to each other as they endured the 16C ocean as well as the big swells that battered them. Floating for nearly an hour in the cold waters, the group saw an empty lifeboat drifting towards them. After a few minutes of swimming, all five were able to get out of the water and into the comparativly warm lifeboat. Using the survival kit inside the lifeboat, Omol was able to signal for emergency which made it possible for the crew of another ship to locate and rescue them. The crew of MV Fortune Express were able to pull them out of the water just before 10 p.m.


source DSN
type A
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The vessel [Setsuyo Star] is another instance of an iron ore carrier developing hull fractures en route from Brazil to China which become noticeable by the time the ship reached the Cape of Good Hope. The Alexandros T became the latest casualty when she broke up and sank in May with a heavy loss of life about 280 miles south of Port Elizabeth. Seven of the bulker's seafarers were plucked to safety after being washed overboard by a big wave. They were lucky enough to find two life rafts in the sea near them despite it being dark at night. Another bulker that responded to a call for help before the Alexandros T sank picked them up in the morning and later took then to Durban.


source Woinin
type A
volume
material
dead 26
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2006-May-4. Capesize bulker ALEXANDROS T. (St.Vincent & Grenadines 91164grt, built in 1989, class=LR), loaded with iron ore, sank off South Africa after reporting a severe list. 26 crew members are missing. Unless a cargo shift took place, a never reported event with iron ore, on the basis of the story of the few survivor it is quite obvious that the casualty is again due to a side shell failure that a double hull could easily have avoided.


source CTX
type C
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dead
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