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Precis File
SHIP NAME: California KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 5
source BERNAMA
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Two ships collided in the Malacca Straits early Friday, and one sank. But no people died in the accident. The Banama-registered ship M.V. California sank after it collided in the early morning with M.V. Sinokor Seoul, a ship registered in the Republic of Korea, at around 1:30 a.m. (1730 GMT Thursday), Malaysian maritime officials said. The accident occurred 10.5 nautical miles southwest of Undan Island in the state of Malacca, but all of the 24 crew members of the M.V. California were rescued, the Malaysian Marine Department said in a statement earlier Friday. The statement, issued through Malaysia's national news agency Bernama, did not identify the nationalities of the 24 crew members as well as the types of the two ships. Bernama said that the captain of the M.V. California was a Ukrainian national. The Malaysian authorities had sent vessels to the area to investigate the accident and monitor and control any sea pollution there.


source Marine Observer
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Be advised the Sinokor Seoul, collided with the M.v California in the aft starboard engineroom area after reportedly blacking out. The California was the vessel hit. Marine observer | 03.30.06 - 8:29 am | #


source DSN
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An overtaking boxship is said to have holed the 76,000-dwt bulker California (built 1979) in the early morning hours Friday. The vessel is one of four 1970s-built bulkers in the fleet of New York-based Standard Shipping (Stanships), headed by Paul Sa, who is the chairman of the American Club. Representatives of Stanships describe the company as the commercial manager of the California. They cite ‘early indications’ that the containership was overtaking when it holed the bulker in way of the engineroom on its starboard aft quarter. The ship sank some 11 hours later in the Malacca Straits, where it now lies in the main shipping channel in Malaysian waters. All seafarers were safely rescued by the crew of the boxship, the 1,450–teu Sinokor Seoul (built 1980), owned by Sinokor Merchant Marine of South Korea. The Stanship representatives say pollution control is the first priority now. Smit Salvage vessels have been on scene since early on Friday. The vessel had some 90 tonnes of fuel oil and eight tonnes of diesel on board. The bulker’s representatives do not believe significant pollution has occurred but acknowledge that “a slight oily sheen surrounds the wreck”. They add that the Panama-flag, Russian Register-class bulker was fully laden with iron ore from India destined for China. In November, another Stanships bulker, the 64,000-dwt General Trader (built 1976), was sold for some $3.7m in a scrap deal that allowed the buyer to trade the vessel for up to six months. The transaction followed a scathing detention report on General Trader by port-state control officers of the US Coast Guard (USCG).


source GISIS
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On 24th March 2006 the m/v CALIFORNIA and m/v Sinokor Seoul collided in the Malacca straits and at approximately 10.15 hours LT the transom of CALIFORNIA slowy disappeared into the water and she sank stern first, completely disappearing in about two or three minutes. The estimated draft for arrival in Singapore that should have occurred at about noon on 24th March was forward 13.75m. and aft 13.83m. The chief Engineer estimated that there were about 90 metric tonnes of fuel oil, 7 metric tonnes of diesel oil and about 20,000 litres of lubricating oil on board at the time CALIFORNIA sank beneath the waters of Malacca Strait.


source CTX
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Not sure how much weight to give the black out report, but 90 tons of BFO and 8 tons of MDO is a ridiculously small amount of bunkers for a ship this size. Even if she could actually pump the dregs of the bunker tanks, she would have barely made it to Singapore. A portion of the fuel in the bottom of the tanks is simply not pumpable. It is quite possible th California simply ran out of fuel.

What we do know is the Russian Registry suspended Class in August 2005 and withdrew Class on 2006-02-02. She apparently was without Class when she loaded in India. How this is possible we don't know. We also know that in her last PSC inspection in Gibraltar, 2005-05-17, she was detained for 6 days with 20 deficiencies, many of them major. And 2006-10-05 also in Gibraltar she was fined for a small oil spill due to a crack from a bunker tank to a ballast tank.

GISIS has no cause info. CTX's guess is that the report of a black out may well be correct.

In any case, if the ship had been twin screw (twin engine rooms) she almost certainly would not have sunk.