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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Cape Africa KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 3
source SMIT
type A
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Cape Africa April 2004 The 150,000 DWT carrier lost several side shell plates near the very sensitive South African coast. The crew had to abandon the ship after reports of extensive structural damage. The South African authorities ordered the vessel to remain at least 120 miles away from the coast until all bunker fuel had been transferred. This was in order to protect the environment in case of oil spoilage. Over 1900 tons of fuel were removed from the vessel

After the fuel transfer operation the Cape Africa was towed by the SMIT Amandla into False Bay. In a ship to ship operation the 140,000 tons of ore was discharged to chartered offloading tonnage. Afterwards the ship was towed to a repair yard. The whole operation took 81 days and was completed successfully.


source FOGHORN
type A
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Efforts to transfer oil from the bulk carrier CAPE AFRICA off the coast of South Africa have taken on an international aspect. A Dutch tug, SMIT AMANDLA and Russion tug NIKOLAI CHIKER are working with the South African vessels KUSWAG IV, SA AGHULAS and UMALUSI. The plan is to transfer 1,900 tons of bunkers from the holed bulk carrier to one or more of these vessels. The hole - 20 metres by five metres - is in the port side of number three hold and is believed to have occurred in a storm. Bad weather hampered the oil transfer operation early on, the Russian tug getting a rope wrapped around its port propeller and having to return to Cape Town to have it removed. The oil was eventually removed and the vessel towed into False Bay, South Africa. A ‘keep out’ zone has been established around the vessel to keep observers at a safe distance during the operations.

The 150,000- ton CAPE AFRICA was built in 199? and is registered in Taiwan. The master and crew were flown off the ship on 28 April and the ship was ordered to remain at least 120 miles west of Cape Town to prevent any oil washing ashore in South Africa.

A 26 X 11 X 1.5 metre steel cofferdam was constructed with the intention of placing it over the hole and welding it in place. It would serve as a cover over the hole and provide structural strength for the vessel to complete its permanent repairs. Attempts to place the structure over the hole were hampered by the swell, which caused the cofferdam to swing as the water sloshed into and out of the hole. The cofferdam punched a 20 X 20cm hole in No 2 double bottom tank after breaking cables and chains holding it in place. The cofferdam was dropped to the seabed to prevent further damage being caused.

The plan now is to remove 80,000 tons of iron ore and take the vessel into port for temporary repairs. A second cofferdam is being constructed for repairs to No 4 hold where frames have been tripped and plates indented.

One press photo of the bow of the CAPE AFRICA shows water draining down the hawse pipe, the sea level in the photo being just at the crown of the anchor. The caption reads, ‘Water pours from a huge hole in the hull of the bulk carrier Cape Africa.’ The article refers to structural damage in hold number three. Where are the nautical advisors to the media?


source CTX
type D
volume N
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Classed ABS, last SS Oct 2001. Clarksons says flag is Singapore. One surveyor said the hole in No 3, stretched from bulkhead to bulkhead. Another source claims hole was 286 m2. The Foghorn entry indicates that Hold 4 was ready to go, which would have sunk the ship. The crew was very smart (and lucky) to abandon.