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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Gulser Ana KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source Lloyds List
type A
volume
material
dead
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Three sailors where injured yesterday at Belfast Docks as they carried out a safety test on a lifeboat on the Gulser Ana. The men fell from the ship when one of the hooks on the locking mechanism attached to the lifeboat released, plunging the men into 40 feet of water. The men were rescued by the Harbour Pilot boat and taken to hospital. One of the sailors received head injuries, while the other two are thought to be being treated for hypothermia. A fourth man was later taken to hospital suffering from shock. The Turkish 23,000 gross tonne bulk carrier was unloading coal when it was detained with 38 items involving deficiencies with fire equipment, lifeboats and ISM (International Safety Management) Code. Captain Bill Bennett, who detained the vessel commented: "This is the third time that Gulser Ana has been detained in ten months. The deficiencies are serious and if this vessel had been allowed to sail there could have been serious implications for both the crew and the vessel. We are concerned to hear that this incident has happened on board Gulser Ana, and would like to wish both crewmen a full and speedy recovery. This incident demonstrates the importance and thoroughness of Port State Control." Officials from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency are investigating the cause of the accident.


source GISIS
type D
volume 392KL
material
dead
link

On 17 October 2001, GULSER ANA was alongside in Belfast, Ireland. The previous day the ship had undergone a port state control inspection and a number of deficiencies were noted, in particular, that the on-load release hooks on the starboard lifeboat were seized. At 08:00 the starboard lifeboat was lowered to the water so two seamen could free up and grease the hooks. The seamen found in the course of their work that the operating rod for the after hook had sheared and so they used some lashing to secure the hook in the closed position. When they had completed their work, the lifeboat was hoisted back to the embarkation deck and the mate boarded the lifeboat to inspect the work. Approximately 30 seconds to a minute later, the forward hook opened spontaneously and the lifeboat was left hanging vertically from the after fall. The two seamen and the mate fell into the water. The two seamen, who were wearing lifejackets, managed to bring the mate to the surface and were picked up a short time later by a pilot launch. The seamen had both sustained minor injuries and the mate was hospitalised with more serious injuries. 3. Contributing Factors: - The release mechanism was poorly maintained and in an unsafe condition. - The safety pin securing the release lever was missing. - It is possible that the forward hook was either not fully reset or that the crew in the lifeboat inadvertently tripped the release lever. - The crew did not have sufficient training or instructions to safely maintain the system. - The on-load release manufacturer’s operating and maintenance instructions were not in the language of the crew. - The ship had no system in place to ensure that the repair and testing of the hooks was carried out safely and effectively. - An ISM Code audit carried out on behalf of the Flag Authority did not ensure that the instructions for the maintenance of the lifeboat release system were appropriate, comprehensive and easily understood by the crew. 4. Issues Raised/Lessons Learned: Operations involving the maintenance and operation of lifeboat on-load release systems are inherently risky. Every ship’s safety management system should include rigorous provisions for training, maintenance and the operation of these systems. 5. Observations on the Human Element: The operation and maintenance instructions for the lifeboat on-load release system were not in the language of the crew and were thus effectively useless to them.


source MAIB
type D
volume
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link http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources/gulser-ana.pdf

Good UK report. Must reading for anyone concerned about the lifeboat release issue. Like all on-load release systems, this contraption is a finicky combination of links, cams, and detentes. At a minimum, it requires careful maintenance and a good understanding of the system. In this case, the maintenance was lousy and understanding was non-existent. The MAIB report has some good photos showing both the complexity and the poor condition. The manual, duly approved by BV, was written in very poor Japlish, impenetrable even to a native English speaker. Most of the Turkish crew spoke little or no English.


source CTX
type D
volume
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This casualty was nearly inevitable. The Gulser Ana was a lousy ship. Her PSC record was terrible. Some of her manuals, which had to be approved by Class, were useless.

Yet she continued to trade until August, 2009 when she drifted aground on Madagascar after a main engine failure.