Back to Casualty List | Search The Casualty Database
Precis File
SHIP NAME: Million Hope KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source SSY
type A
volume
material
dead
link

Grounded on coral reefs near Sharm el-Sheik. Vessel ripped apart and lying partially submerged on reef.


source Lloyds List
type D
volume 700
material
dead 0
link

Egyptian maritime officials concerned about leakage of 23,000 tons of phopsphate and potassium plus 700 tons of fuel from the bulk carrier Million Hope which sank off Egypt's Sinai Penisula. All 25 crew members were rescued by Egyptian naval vessels. The vessel on a voyage from Jordan to Taiwan was ripped open by coral reefs near Egypt's Sharm el-Sheik resort. Some of the crew accused the master of failing to follow the area's prescribed navigation routes and of maintaining speed despite poor visibility. Cargo was 15,000 tons potash and 11,000 tons phosphate rock.


source Middleton
type D
volume
material
dead
link

The ship had several names during her lifetime before being purchased by the Aksonas Shipping Co of Limassol for 1.36 mm pds. It was at this time she was finally renamed Million Hope and promptly insured for 4.1 mm pds. Only six weeks later, she became a constructive total loss.

Loaded with a 26,000 ton of potash and phosphates, the Million Hope sailed from Aqaba on 19 June 1996 destination Taiwan. Visibility however quickly deteriorated and early on 20 June, the vessel struck the inshore reeef near Nabq, on the western shore of the Gulf of Aqaba, approx 3 mi N of Sharm el Sheik.

Evidence that ship buckled on impact, prop was still turning, rudder torn away.

Apparently, most of the cargo was off-loaded. Remainder dissolved. Ship came down on portions of the 1970 wreck Hey Daroma, a 1736 grt general cargo ship.


source CTX
type D
volume
material
dead
link

ITOPF says 7.5 km of coastline contaminated but does not give a volume. The ship had to carry at least enough bunkers to make Singapore, so the 700 tons on-board is reasonable. But we don't know how much the salvors recovered. Since most of the bunkers was probably in double bottom tanks, it is likely that it wasn't much. Guessing 500 ton spill for now.

Ship was twin engine, single screw.

Insurance fraud is a real possibility; but for now calling it navigational stupidity. It is pretty clear that this owner spent a lot more time worrying about insurance than they did about the competence of their captain.