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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Seki KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 3
source LMIU
type D
volume
material
dead
link

Contacted tanker Baynunah in Gulf of Oman, off Fujairah, in 25 10.8 N 56 30.8 E 30 Mar 1994 while anchored for supplies No 1 port tank holed, causing oil spill Arrested Sd 27 Sep Transhipped cargo Sd Dubai prev 29 Nov after repairs. Master freed Aug 1995 after 6 months' detention.


source FSI
type A
volume 16000T
material
dead
link

Contributory factors to this incident are the failure of the give way vessel [Baynunah] to take early and substantial action to keep clear of the stand on vessel (Seki) and avoid any attempt to cross ahead of the stand on vessel.

No attempt was made by either vessel to make VHF contact when uncertain of the intentions or actions of the other, Had such contact been made early and actions agreed then the collision could have been averted.

Wrongful alleged assumption that the Seki was about to anchor. The switching of the Seki bridge floodlight and poop deck lighting to facilitate crew taking stores may have led to such an assumption but as this did not occur until 2245 some 45 minutes after first sighting it is considered that avoiding action should have been taken much earlier and that the switching on the lights was not a contributory factor.

The comparative lack of manoeuverability of a large VLCC at very low speed, i.e. inability to make a substantial and rapid alteration of course in an emergency situation when approaching an anchorage in close proximity to other vessels. This in itself does not categorize such a vessel as per the definition Rule 3 of a "vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre" but shows the predicament of the Master of the Seki in making a decision to take action as the staand on vessel when the give way vessel fails her obligation to keep clear in a crossing situation.


source CTX
type D
volume 16000T
material
dead
link

CEDRE puts spill at 16000T, so does IOPCF. ETC says 119,048B. Japanese source says Seki was anchored 15 km off Fujairah, when hit by Baynunah, causing a hole in No 1 Port. Puts spill at abt 15000 tons. FSI 4/5 Annex 1 agrees but does not have spill volume.

Most sources claim the Seki was anchored but the FSI synopsis of the Panamanian report makes it clear that she was actually going very slowly while taking on stores, a common practice off Fujairah. If the Panamanian report is correct, Baynunah was the give way vessel, tried to pass in front, and did not make it, possibly because Baynunah thought Seki was anchored when she was actually moving. The fact that the Baynunah hit the Seki on the port side is consistent with this picture.

The Baynunah was a UAE flag ship with a British master. CTX has not seen the UAE report if there is one. But the locals immediately blamed the master of the Seki and pulled his passport for more than six months.

The Panamanian report understates the maneuverabilty of a single screw tanker at very low speed. Basically,she has none. The only way to get low speed maneuverabilty on a big tanker is twin screw. In this case, however, not clear what the Seki master should ahve done if he had twin screw. His big screw up was not getting on the VHF.