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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Katina P. KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 5
source LMIU
type C
volume Y
material
dead
link

Sustained crack in starboard side during heavy weather off Maputo 16 Apr 1992 Deliberately beached at mouth of Maputo Bay 18 Apr Severely damaged amidships, oil spill Towed out 22 Apr Broke up and sank in 25 04.1 S 36 53.3 E 26 Apr.


source USCG Incident News
type A
volume 25000BBL
material
dead
link

On April 19, 1992, the master of the Greek-owned, Maltese-flagged vessel Katina P intentionally grounded the ship 25 miles north of Maputo, Mozambique. The vessel, en route from Venezuela to the Persian Gulf, had suffered structural damage during a storm. Two tanks were reported to be holed and an estimated 25,000 barrels of #6 fuel oil released. A Protection and Indemnity Club representative inspected the vessel the next day and estimated that the vessel would soon break up.


source SSY
type A
volume Y
material
dead
link

Damaged in heavy weather off Mozambiique on laden voyage from Fujairah. Broke in two and sank under tow.


source Wayne Stephen
type A
volume Y
material
dead 0
link

I was guided to your site by your book The Tankship Tromedy. I particularly viewed your data on the Katina P, as I was the Second Engineer on board the John Ross, the salvage tug that took Katina P in tow. I also lay claim to having taken the photographs you have published on your site.

My recollection of events is slightly different to those described in your database.

The vessel was carrying a cargo of HFO from Brazil to Fujairah, coals to Newcastle? and was then destined to be broken up. The initial breaking up of the vessel was heard/noted by the ship's crew as she rounded the Cape. Vessel was cracked on the starboard side through the side shell plating. However, the crack was aft of the cargo manifold, also a location of SBT. The Chief Officer of John Ross reported that most of the deck longitudinals had detached from the deck.

The vessels was not grounded off Maputo. She was anchored and abandoned by the ship's crew. The Master, Chief and 2n Engineers returned to the vessel when the salvage operation was commenced. This was not expected to be successful as own vessel was on a daily hire rate rather than a Lloyd's Open Form contract. On our arrival at Katina P's location, it was observed that the hull forward of the break was upright whilst the accommodation section had a pronounced starboard list. Katina P was taken in tow with the intention of meeting with a lightening ship to try and recover as much oil as possible. Katina P sank before the arrival of the lightening ship.

Some 40 personnel, involved in restoring power to the boilers inorder to have the cargo pumps operational, were transferred from Katina P to our vessel, and two others also in attendance without incident. One person delayed leaving the vessel as he attempted to rescue the ship's cat, but he was unable to catch it and had to leave.

Of interest is that the lightening ship, the name of which I do not recall, was an OBO which proceeded to Richard's Bay to load a full cargo of coal. During loading the main sea water line ruptured at night and the engine room flooded resulting in the ship's sinking. It is understood but not confirmed that the vessel and Katina P were owned by the same company, although naturally in one ship companies.


source CTX
type C
volume 72000T
material C
dead 0
link

ITOPF puts spill at 72,000T.

There is a picture of the sinking at http://www.geocities.com/uksteve.geo/katina.html. The sinking took place in calm weather. Ship has clearly failed in sag. The USCG claim that the ship was in ballast is wrong. A tanker in ballast is quite unlikely to fail in sag from midships flooding, and the photos pretty clearly show a loaded ship. So we are going with the ITOPF spill volume. The break is just forward of the manifolds, the usual location of the SBT. In a loaded pre-Marpol tanker, the only tanks whose flooding can add a lot to sagging moment are the midships segregated ballast tanks.

The combination of Malta and Hellenic Register is not confidence inspiring. Most likely, wastage in the segregated ballast tanks is the primary cause.

The above comments were written before CTX received Mr. Stephen's valuable contribution, confirming the cause. Mr. Stephen's first hand account also demonstrates just how inaccurate and/or uninformative the public summaries of ship casualties can be.