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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Hyundai New World KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source HOOKE
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Exactly one year and one day after the loss due to grounding of the huge South Korean iron ore carrier Daeyang Family off the coast of South Africa, another massive South KOrean bulk carrier, ther 1986 built, 101,487 tons gross, 199,483 tons deadweight Hyundai New World rang aground, this time off the coast of Brazil near San Luiz de Maranhao. She had in her enormous holds, 101,803 tons of American coal loaded at Norfolk, Virginia, and 94,860 tons of Brazilian iron ore loaded at Ponta da Madeira, near Itaqui. The grounding occurred at high tide shortly after undocking from Ponta da Madeira during the evening of March 31, 1987, while waiting at the outer anchorage for a spare main cylinder liner to arrive.

Refloating attempts failed, with the holds of the wrecked vessel subsequently becoming flooded, the situation worsened day by day due to continuous pounding by 22 ft waves. A month after the original grounding, Brazilian Navy officials stated that the ship would break in two at any moment, with there being no chance of any successful salvage. She gradually settled into the silt of the river bed, the entire cargo section being submerged.

The enormous $32.5m hull and machinery insurance of the Hyunda New World was placed in London, while the combined value of her coal and ore cargo was put at $7m.


source Reuters, 19870401
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Seven tugs will attempt to refloat the South Korean motor bulk carrier Hyundai New World tonight, Lloyds shipping intelligence service said in its latest update. The vessel grounded close to Itaqui port in Brazil last night after undocking from Ponta da Madeira terminal. Lloyds said the 200,000 dwt vessel is carrying about 180,000 tons of ore. Five holds are partially flooded and there is some leakage of bunkers from double bottom tanks. At low water tide the vessel has a list of five degrees to port and the list increases as the tide rises.


source Mol, J.J, The Human Factor in Ship Handlinrg
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Some notorious casaulties in the past were the loss of the large low powered bulk carrier Hundai New World in Ponta da Madeira, Brazil in 1985 [sic] and a few years later the catastrophe with the tanker Exxon Valdez in Alaska. Both sbips were fully loaded. Misjudgement of the turning capacity of the vessels, a common human error, resulted in the total loss of the bulk carrier and her cargo and an enormous oil spill caused by the tanker.


source CTX
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This was a brand new ship on her second loaded voyage.

Hooke's account is a little garbled and not very helpful. We don't know what to make of the comment that she was waiting for a cylinder liner.

The only hint we have on cause is Mol. We don't know what Mol's comments are based on, but they were contained in a paper delivered to the 1st Joint Conference on Marine Safety and Environment, June, 1992, so they probably were not made lightly. Mol clearly indicates the ship was under-control when she stranded. At this point, we don't know the ship's power, but she was a diesel. And it is a very safe bet that she had very poor low speed maneuverability. Mol, of course, takes the standard approach: blame the crew for the ship's shortcomings. They knew or should have known that the ship had nil low speed maneuverability, so it is their fault if they got themselves into a situation the ship could not handle. The alternative of improving the ship is almost never mentioned, certainly not by Mol.