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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Patmos KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 5
source LMIU
type C
volume
material
dead
link

Collision, on fire, beached Mar 21 1985 off Calabria Refloated, taken in tow for open sea later same day Fire extinguished Mar 22 Towed in Mar 24. Sold and broken up.


source HOOKE
type D
volume 1100T
material
dead 3
link

Greek MT Patmos loaded Ceyhan to Savona with 83,000 tons of crude collided with Spanish MT Castillo de Montearagon in Strait of Messina. Patmos had long tear in side caught fire, and abandoned, and beached, 3 dead, Scrapped.


source OSCH
type A
volume 5300B
material Kirkuk crude
dead
link

On March 21, 1985, the Patmos and the Castillo de Montearagon collided in the Straits of Messina. The Patmos was carrying 828,300 barrels of Kirkuk crude oil while the Castillo de Montearagon was in ballast. The Patmos caught fire and was grounded on the beach of Villagio Torre Faro, Sicily. Firefighters subsequently towed the vessel off the beach to maneuver it for firefighting efforts. The fire was extinguished on March 23, and the Patmos was brought to dock at Messina, Sicily.

Kirkuk Crude Oil has an API gravity of 35.1, and a pour point of -8 degrees F. Approximately 5,300 barrels of Kirkuk crude oil spilled from the Patmos. The majority of the spilled oil moved south through the Straits of Messina. Most of the oil broke up in the variable currents of the strait, forming separate slicks that moved south at different rates. Some of the oil initially released moved to the north due to tidal currents. By March 23, most of the oil to the north had dissipated, but there was some sheen and mousse in the area. As the oil moved south it incorporated garbage, amounts of which typically exist in the waters east of Sicily.


source WOININ 2005-03-31
type A
volume
material
dead 3
link

I checked also another casualty that I even witnessed: the collision between the tankers PATMOS(loaded) and the CASTILLO de MONTE ARAGON(On ballast). Please note that you mention 0 dead, but the chief mate, also watch officer, died on the PATMOS while two other crew were missing (Lloyd's List 22-3-1985). I was then master of a container ship and when I came to the bridge when passing Stromboli island, I saw the CASTILLO de MONTE ARAGAON slightly ahead of us, hoping we shall overtake it well before we enter the Messina strait.

Finally it did happen so, but once we rounded Capo Peloro we faced almost ahead the PATMOS which was proceeding very slowly in the middle of the channel while there was enough water on her starboard side and the Greek tanker had already passed the ferry tracks. We came to starboard as required by the collision regulations, but at about the same moment the PATMOS came to port creating a serious collision risk. Thanks to our speed and enough room on our starboard side we could easily pass ahead of the PATMOS and then I had to pay more attention to the ferries. But once South the all the ferry tracks, knowing that the PATMOS had also to pass the CASTILLO de MONTE ARAGON behind us, I wanted to watch their meeting on the radar. Effectively their respective echoes came closer and closer up to the point they formed only one target on the radar PPI. Although this is quite a common feature for ships close of each other, I looked outside just in time to watch a large flash of light in the darkness. In a few minutes the whole strait seemed covered with flames.

The weather or sea state was fair, visibility was excellent and the local time of the incident was 05.31.

As they were plenty small craft to offer assistance in the many ports of the strait and we were anyway loaded with dangerous goods we could do nothing to help, but I sent a message to the management offering to bring my testimony to help the unfortunate master of the Spanish tanker because obviously the navigation of the PATMOS was extremely poor, however I never heard anything more about the casualty until one friend working for an insurance company sent me that article months later.

After this accident, pilotage was made compulsory in the Messian strait, and I believe that loaded tankers cannot go through it any more. Although a steering problem could be the cause of the accident, the fact that the PATMOS gave the wrong maneuver when she met us almost ruled out this steering failure option.

Best regards,
Pierre WOININ


source CTX
type C
volume 5300B
material
dead 3
link

ETC says 5131B crude, Straits of Messina, CEDRE says 700 tons.

We are fortunate indeed to have Captain Woinin's eyewitness account. The Patmos was headed north; the Montearagon south. The collision occured at just about the narrowest part of the Strait across from Pace where the Patmos would have had to turn to starboard to stay on the east side of the Strait for a port to port passing. Captain Woinin guesses that the Patmos made the same error with the Monteraragon that it made with him, but he cannot confirm this. The Montearagon suffered extensive damage on the starboard side forward with the deepest penetration being 15 m.[Lloyds List, 1985-03-25]. The damage extended from frames 103 to 128. The damage included the aft end of focsle bulwark, and extended down below the waterline. The location of the damage would seem to make it less likely that the Montearagon altered to starboard while the Patmos altered to port. All that we can for sure at this point was that the Patmos bridge was poorly manned.