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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Tifoso KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source LMIU
type C
volume
material
dead
link

Aground during heavy weather, holed Jan 20 1983, 1.5 miles NW of North Road, near Bermuda Refloated, towed out Feb 02 Deliberately sunk Feb 04 in 33 18 N 63 33 W.


source HOOKE
type A
volume
material
dead 0
link

The 138,823 dwt Liberian motor tanker Tifoso was on a ballast passage from Boston to Port Gentil, Gabon when she struck reefs and grounded in heavy weather about 11 miles north of Bermuda, about 1.5 mi NW of North Rock, on January 20, 1983, after having diverted to Bermuda with generator trouble. Badly holed, with her forepeak, several cargo tanks both the pump room and the engine room flooded, the 30 man crew abandoned the wrecked vessel.

The master, Captain Kyriakis Dimitriadis, told a Bermudan Government inquiry that he had no charts of the area and the grounding occurred because he mistook one navigational beacon for another. He subsequently faced 11 charges of neglect.


source CAHILL-G
type C
volume
material
dead 0
link

Ship had been laid up in Boston. Got a cargo Gabon to Taiwan. One day out one of the two diesel generators failed. The next day the second failed, leaving the ship dependent on the turbine generator. Owners ordered ship to divert to Bermuda. But she had no charts for Bermuda. The buoy he chose for a landfall had been removed 10 months earlier. The newly purchased List of Lights had not been updated. He confused a different buoy for the buoy he was after, and went aground.


source CTX
type C
volume 300M3
material
dead 0
link

ETC has the spill at 2168 barrels of bunkers, which is surprisingly low.

The presumption is that it is the Captain's fault that they did not have sufficiently detailed charts of Bermuda. In fact, captains have nil control over what charts are on-board. The owner decided that, since the ship was never going to Bermuda, no point in spending the money. The tanker market was in a disastrous slump in 1983. When the generator problems forced the master to stop at Bermuda, all of sudden it's his fault. See also Aguila Azteca.

None of the commentators seem that surprised nor give a great deal of weight to machinery reliability. The fact that two generators fail in as many days in a manner which does not allow them to be repaired without shoreside assitance is mentioned almost casually.