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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Ogden Willamette KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 3
source USCG
type A
volume
material
dead 0
link http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/moa/boards/ogdenwillamette.pdf

At about 0200, on 16 June 1982, the SS OGDEN WILLAMETTE, on a loaded voyage suffered major engine room flooding approximately 47 miles southeast of Morant Point, Jamaica in the Caribbean Sea. With the vessel sinking and the possibility of a boiler explosion, the master ordered abandon ship. Within an hour the entire crew was rescued by the Chilean freighter COPIAPO. At daylight on 16 June 1982, the OGDEN WILLAMETTE remained afloat with her stern awash. It was towed to an anchorage 1/2 mile off of the southwestern tip of Little Cayman Island. There, the engine room was dewatered and the cargo was lightered to the tankship ESSO ZURICH (Panama). Finally it was towed to New Orleans, LA where repairs were made. This document contains the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Board of Investigation Report and the action taken by the Commandant to determine the proximate cause of the casualty and the recommendations to prevent recurrence. The Commandant has concurred with the Marine Board that the proximate cause of the casualty was that the low sea suction non- metallic expansion joint failed. The Coast Guard is preparing specific guidance regarding the inspection of expansion joints.


source NTSB
type A
volume
material
dead 0
link

About 0015 on June 16, 1982, water was discovered in the engineroom bilges on the U.S. flag tankship OGDEN WILLAMETTE, which was in the Caribbean Sea about 50 nmi southeast of Jamaica with 150,000 barrels of crude oil aboard. The entry of water exceeded the capacity of the bilge pump, and eventually the engineering plant was secured. Although the chief engineer closed certain valves, the water continued to rise, and the master ordered the crew to abandon ship. The engineroom flooded to about 6 feet below the main deck. The vessel remained afloat with its after deck awash. It was towed to the Cayman Islands, where the engineroom was pumped out and the cargo was transferred to another tanker. The OGDEN WILLAMETTE was later towed to New Orleans for repairs. The damage was estimated to be $16 million. The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the flooding of the engineroom of the OGDEN WILLAMETTE was the rupture of the nonmetallic expansion joint in the main low sea suction line to the main circulating water pumps, and the failure of the chief engineer to close the auxiliary condenser's overboard discharge valve when securing the seavalves, permitting seawater to backflow through the auxiliary cooling system via the main cooling system to the ruptured joint when the main circulating water pumps were stopped. Contributing to the extent of the flooding was the failure of the chief engineer to direct use of the emergency bilge suction from the main circulating pumps and the flooding of the shaft alley through a watertight door that was not closed completely.


source CTX
type C
volume
material
dead 0
link

A very close call and another argument for twin screw with two engine rooms. The only thing really unusual about this close call is that it was investigated.