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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Tanio KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 7
source LMIU
type C
volume
material
dead
link

Broke in two during heavy weather, abandoned Mar 07 1980 in 49 15 12 N 04 14 54 W Forepart sank later same day in 49 10 18 N 04 15 30 W Aftpart taken in tow Mar 8, towed in Mar 12. Aftpart sold and broken up.


source OSCH
type D
volume 98955B
material
dead 8
link

On March 7, 1980, the tanker Tanio, carrying 190,580 barrels of No. 6 fuel oil, broke in two off the coast of Brittany, France during a violent storm. The master and seven crew members died as a result of the accident. Approximately 98,955 barrels of oil spilled into the sea as a result of the breakup. The bow section, which still contained 36,650 barrels of oil, sank in 300 feet of water. Substantial amounts of oil continued to leak from the sunken bow until several small leaks in the bow were sealed in May. The stern remained afloat and was towed to the port of Le Havre where its remaining 54,975 barrels of oil were offloaded. Strong northwest winds at the time of the incident moved the oil towards the Breton coast. Due to the high viscosity of the oil and severe weather conditions, containment or dispersal at sea was impossible. Because the spring tides in this region have an average tidal range of 26 feet, many areas along the coast could not be boomed effectively. Consequently, the Breton coast (which had already received major oil impacts from the Torrey Canyon spill in 1967 and the Amoco Cadiz in 1978), was again severely oiled. Approximately 45 percent of the Amoco Cadiz spill area was affected by oil from the Tanio. Approximately 125 miles of the coastline of the two Departments of Finistere and Cotes-du-Nord were oiled. Both Departments implemented the Plan Polmar, the French national oil spill contingency plan, due to the severity of the coastal oiling.


source ETC
type L
volume 98955B
material
dead
link


source HOOKE
type A
volume 12500T
material
dead 8
link

While on voyage from Wilhelmshaven to Civitavecchia, loaded with 25,061 tonnes of high sulphur fuel oil, the Madagascan motor tank Tanio broke in two off the coast of Brittany near the Ile de Batz during severe weatgher conditions that reached violent storm force 11 at 635 am on March 7, 1980. The forepart with 10,000 tons of the fuel oil sank at 5 pm later the same day in lat 40.10N, long 04.16W with consequent heavy leakage of her cargo into the sea. Eight of her 39 crew members died, the 31 survivors being picked up by helicopter. The following day the still floating aft section, reported to be holding some 12,000 tons of cargo was towed to St Brieuc Bay to shelter from the continuing storm.

The afterpart of the Tanio arrived at Le Havre on March 12, after which the remaining cargo was pumped out to barges.


source CEDRE
type L
volume 6000T
material
dead 8
link http://www.le-cedre.fr/en/spill/tanio/tanio.php


source ITOPF
type A
volume
material
dead
link http://www.itopf.com/casehistories.html#tanio

Tanio On 7th March, 1980 the Tanio broke up during violent weather conditions off the northern coast of Brittany, France. As a result, approximately 14,500 tonnes of the heavy fuel oil cargo were spilled. Strong north-westerly winds moved the oil towards the same Breton coast which had been impacted by oil from the Amoco Cadiz almost exactly two years earlier, and from the Torrey Canyon in 1967. Due to the high viscosity of the oil and severe weather conditions, neither chemical dispersal nor containment and recovery techniques at sea were possible. Because of its persistent nature the spilled oil eventually contaminated about 200 km of coastline to varying degrees, with small amounts again spreading as far as the Channel Islands.

Bulk oil was removed from shorelines using tractor-drawn vacuum trucks, although this technique could not be used on cold, cloudy days when the oil became too viscous. The desire to speed up the removal of the bulk oil from priority amenity beaches in advance of a particularly high tide resulted in the use of bulldozers and front-end loaders. Whilst much oil (and a considerable amount of beach material) was removed within a short time, the underlying sediments at a number of sites were heavily contaminated and required extensive restoration work at a later stage. The removal of bulk oil was followed by the cleaning of the rocks in the tourist areas, using hot water washing machines and high pressure cold water jets, in time for the start of the holiday season in July.

Environmental and economic impacts were limited, although approximately 1,700 dead birds, primarily guillemots and other auks, were recovered during the incident. There were some localised fishery impacts, such as contaminated oyster beds and shellfish holding pens, as well as disruption of seaweed harvesting. Intertidal fauna and flora was also damaged by smothering and by the extensive clean-up operations at the severely affected areas. The lack of international media attention minimised the effect on tourism.


source CTX
type C
volume 14500T
material
dead 8
link

This sounds exactly like the Prestige/Erika, small tanker, carrying high density cargo, breaks in two in sag (see Cedre picture) in very heavy weather in bay of Biscay. Almost certainly a structural failure, but we need confirmation, corrosion, etc.

The French were able to pump some of oil out of the sunken forepart, which is why most sources have a spill volume considerably less than 12,000 tons.