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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Andros Patria KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 6
source SIS83
type D
volume
material
dead 30
link

steering gear failure, then fire and explosion, CTL, killed 30


source ETC
type D
volume 346993B
material Iranian crude
dead
link


source CEDRE
type D
volume 60000T
material Iranian Heavy crude
dead 34
link http://www.le-cedre.fr/en/spill/andros_p/andros_p.php

Says Following an explosion in a tank caused by a large leak in the hull,...


source HOOKE
type D
volume 50000T
material crude oil
dead 30
link

The master, his wife, their two year old son, and 27 crewmen were drowned after the 218,665 dwt Greek steam tanker Andros Patria was abandoned by most of her crew in the Atlantic Ocean off the northwestern coast of Spain on New Year's Eve, 1978. The Andros Patria was on a voyage from Iran's Persian Gulf terminal of Kharg Island to Europoort near Rotterdam loaded with 208,000 tonnes of crude oil, when she developed a 50 ft crack in her hull in very heavy seas and near gale force winds off Cape Finisterre in lat 43.31N, long 09.37W at about 1820 hours GMT on December 31, 1978. Then, some two hours later, following an explosion, a fire broke out in the crack in No 3 tank on the port side, through which oil was pouring out into the sea. After requesting immediate helicopter assistance, 30 persons abandoned ship, taking to a lifeboat, leaving just three men remaining on board. However, the lifeboat capsized throwing its occupants into the sea. None could be saved by the many ships that had arrived on the scene to offer assistance. The three who remained on board were airlifted to safety by a helicopter the following day when it was estimated that 50,000 tonnes of oil had been lost. The rough seas and dumping of large quantities of detergent by local vessels prevented the huge slick from reaching the beaches of Spain.

The drifting tanker was then taken in tow, with neither the Spanish nor Portugese governments wanting the vessel in their waters for fear of pollution. The French and British also advised the salvors that they were refused permission to enter their territorial waters with the stricken ship.

Towed to a position 250 miles south of Azores, lightered. Got to Lisbon but was decleared CTL and scrapped.


source LINK
type A
volume 50000T
material crude oil
dead 30+
link http://www.iumi.com/Conferences/2001_genoa/Stampa/Prebble.rtf

On 31st December 1978, the tanker ANDROS PATRIA was on a voyage from Kharg Island to Europoort carrying a cargo of 208,000 tons of crude oil. She developed a 50 ft crack in her hull in heavy seas off Cape Finisterre. An explosion then occurred and fire broke out in No. 3 port tank from which oil escaped. All but three of the crew abandoned ship and were lost (the remaining three were airlifted to safety).

About 50,000 tons of oil were lost in the incident but the tanker remained afloat and a salvage team boarded her on 4th January 1979. The Spanish, Portuguese, French and British Governments all refused permission for the stricken tanker to enter their territorial waters for fear of pollution. The salvors towed the tanker 250 miles south of the Azores where a Ship to ship transfer was commenced. This continued until 9th February, by which time the continuously moving convoy had reached 200 miles north-west of the Cape Verde Islands. The vessel was then allowed entry into Portuguese waters and on 19th February she berthed at Lisbon. She was eventually sold as scrap to Spanish ship breakers. Clearly, the salvage award was very much greater than it would have been had the vessel been allowed to tranship in sheltered waters further north.


source CTX
type D
volume 50000T
material C
dead 34
link

American Isnstitute of Marine Underwriters repeats the Hokke version. ITOPF says hull failure, 50000T Most sources are in the high 40's.

Only SIS83 talks about steering gear. No hint of steering gear failure in other sources. For now CTX is assuming this is spurious.

Another hull failure in the Bay of Biscay. Normally for a VLCC 3P would be a permanent ballast tank, but we need confirmation. This sounds more like a crack getting out of hand than corrosion. But we need more info. Was 3P a permanent ballast tank, and if so was it coated. Need survey history. Right now all we can say is that it was hull failure.

IGS may have been a big help in containing fire, but at this point we cant be sure ship was inerted.