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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Eleni V KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 7
source CEDRE
type D
volume 5000T
material heavy fuel oil
dead 0
link http://www.le-cedre.fr/en/spill/eleni/eleni.php

Eleni V was loaded with fuel oil from Rotterdam to Grangemouth. Hit by bulk carrier in heavy fog. Bow sank, stern towed in.


source ETC
type L
volume 17568B
material
dead
link


source HOOKE
type A
volume
material
dead
link

The Greek motor tanker Eleni V was en route from Europoort to Grangemouth, carrying 16,000 tonnes of heavy fuel oil, when she was cut in two following a collision in fog with the French bulk carrier Roseline in the North Sea off teh coast of Norfolk in lat 52.49.00N long 01.47.30E, shortly after 11 am on May 6, 1978. All her 39 crew members were safely rescued from lifeboats.


source OSCH
type A
volume 52500B
material HFO
dead
link

On the morning of May 6, 1978, the Greek tanker Eleni V was cut in two by the French vessel Roseline in foggy conditions off the southeast coast of England. The Eleni V was loaded with 117,280 barrels of Heavy Fuel Oil. The collision caused the release of approximately 52,500 barrels of oil. The aft section was towed to Rotterdam by five Dutch tugs. The cargo remaining in the aft section was recovered by pumping it into storage tanks at Europort. The forward section of the vessel drifted away from the collision site. It went aground on May 8 on a sandbank near Lowestoft off the East Anglian coast with approximately 8000 barrels still on board. Attempts to salvage the forward part failed, and authorities decided to blow it up. The bow was towed to a position several miles offshore and blown up with two tons of explosives by Navy divers on May 30. Following the explosion, a large part of the remaining oil burned.

The heavy fuel oil had a viscosity of 5,000 centistokes at 20 degrees C. It formed a huge viscous slick that was brown to black in color. Oil washed ashore on the English and Dutch coasts. Oil on the shoreline formed pancakes between .25 and 12 inches in diameter. Oil was also reported as globules of thick mousse that appeared on the beaches. This became the worst case of marine pollution on the English coast since the Torrey Canyon spill, more than 11 years earlier. Oil impacting on the Dutch coast was identified as similar to that of the Eleni V by gas chromatographic analysis. It was believed to have come from the bow section when it was blown up.


source UNK
type A
volume
material
dead
link

Built in 1958 by John Brown and Company, (Clydebank) Ltd, for the Scottish Tanker Co, Ltd (British + Commonwealth Shipping Group) as the "SCOTTISH PTARMIGAN". She was powered by 2SA 6cyl oil engines manufactured by John Brown. In 1968 she was sold to Liberian Flag operators Compania Naviera Alheli SA Monrovia and renamed "MARKAB" In 1970 she was purchased by N J Vardinoyannis of Greece who renamed her "ELENI V". (the V standing for the owners name and not the Roman numeral five)

On the 6th May 1978 when on passage from Rotterdam to Grangemouth with a cargo of 16,000 tons of heavy fuel oil she was in collision in thick fog with the French Bulk Carrier "ROSELINE", 16,023grt built in 1974 and owned by Union Industrielle et Maritime, Dunkirk 1½ miles from the South Haisboro' Buoy. The "ELENI V" was sliced in two through her pump room which left most of the oil storage tanks intact. Fortunately her entire crew of 39 were rescued by other vessels in the area.

The After part was towed to Rotterdam and berthed at Europort but the forepart rolled over and drifted off. A search was mounted and the forepart was located by the Trinity House Tender "MERMAID" and a line made fast by the Yarmouth Tug "HECTOR READ" and towed 10 miles off shore.


source UNK
type A
volume
material
dead
link

On 6 May 1978, the Greek tanker Eleni V collided with French freighter Roseline at 52.49N 01.47E about 13 km off the East Anglian coast of England. In the collision, the 18,287 dwt Eleni V was cut in two and lost about 3000 tons of its cargo of heavy fuel oil. The tanker's stern section, which contained about 8000 tons of oil, was towed by three Dutch salvage tugs to the Hook of Holland, where it arrived on 8 May, and then on to Rotterdam.

On 8 May, the bow section, containing about 1100 tons of oil, ran aground on a sandbank off the East Anglian coast. British authorities assumed responsibility for this section, Department of Trade officials on-scene urged the British government to have the Royal Navy blow up this section, but the government decided instead to try and salavage it. From 9 to 13 May salvage experts attempted to tow the bow to a suitable beaching area where the oil could be pumped out. During this period, the section continued to spill oil.

On 14 May, the wreck was secured near Southcross Sands, but was later towed into deeper water about 14 km offshore. On 21 May, a decision was made to beach it on Holm Sand, about 3 km off Lowestoft, but the next day it was decided that this location was too unstable for pumping operations. The bow was again towed to deeper water about 14 km offshore.

After another proposed beaching site was rejected, the British government agreed to blow up the bow section. The section was blown up at 52.30N, 2.28E by navy divers, using enough explosives to cause a fireball reaction which burned up much of the remaining oil. Only a small slick was observed on the ocean surface after the explosion. It was estimated that during the collision and salvage attempts, about 5000 topns of oil in total was lost to the marine environment.


source CTX
type D
volume 5000T
material F
dead
link

This was a two island ship. Photos show the ship with nothing forward of the forward house. The cut in two phrase is not an exagerration, but Roseline may not have actually passed though the Eleni. The Eleni V has a beam of 22.05 m. Aside from this casualty, the maximum reported depth of penetration the CTX has seen is about 15 meters. If the Rosaline were loaded, 15 meters penetration could easily have resulted in the remaining structure failing. the remaining structure failing. For now we are accepting the contemporary reports.

This aft section was towed to Rotterdam, and that portion of the cargo was recovered.

Eleni V forced to cross traffic lanes, but no real cause info. Since collision occured on the English side, guess is that Roseline was southbound, in which case Eleni V would have been burdened. Need official investigation. Big discrepancies in volume.

The spill volume is uncertain. Most sources claim the Eleni V was full loaded with about 16,000 tons and that 8000 tons was recovered from the stern. It is possible that the 5000 tons does not include oil burned by the divers. It is interesting that they were able to get heavy fuel to burn in cold water.

The strange post-spill decision making points to a need for a dictator in the Roman sense to make the tough calls in minimizing the impact of a spill.