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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Corinthos KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 2
source USCG
type D
volume
material
dead 26
link http://www.uscg.mil/h1/g-m/moa/boards/edgarmqueeny.pdf

Queeny, an American flag, products carrier, part loaded, was being turned 180 degrees in Delaware River. This inherently dangerous manuever was required since the Queeny was making multiple discharges along the river. This apparently was normal practice. Pilot misjudged and struck Corinthos which was discharging on the other side of the river at the BP terminal. on the port bow. While the penetration was not deep, they managed to hit one of the non-inerted tanks that were being discharged. That tank caught fire immediately. Corinthos ended up being destroyed with 26 dead. Time was just after midnight but weather and visibility were good. Contributory factors were pilot talking to another vessel he was worried about downriver, and the fact that half the channel was closed for dredging.


source CTX
type D
volume
material
dead 26
link

Corinthos was not inerted which could easily have made the difference. Twin screw would have given pilot more manueverabilty, even though Queeny had a bow thruster. Problem with single screw is that you have to have way on to have substantial turning moment.

Since the Corinthos had been discharging for some time, looks like most spill volume estimates are high. Hooke says "nearly completion of discharge of her 52,973 tons of Algerian crude oil".

We need more info on depth of penetration, to say whether double sides would have helped. Very few collision in which one ship's bow is the penetrator result in less than 2 meters penetration. But this might have been one. The USCG indicates the Queeny speed on impact was very low, angle 39 degrees, and somewhat inconsistently Queeny anchor was an important factor in the amount of penetration. Hooke says Queeny had damage to bow, forecastle, and port side shell in way of No 4 port tank. USCG calls the Queeny steel damage minor.

About 3 minutes prior to impact, Queeny Master over-ruled Pilot and went astern. But it took a minute to switch the engine over. During that period, the turn rate slowed from 19 degrees per minute to 12 degrees per minute, which may have made the difference. After the engine was actually going astern, it would have kicked the stern to port assisting the starboard turn, but generating stern swing.

Therre is some evidence that the rudder was left hard starboard went they went astern. If this mistake actually was made, Once the flow over the rudder was reversed, a starboard rudder would have pushed the stern to starboard. then it to could have made the difference. USCG seems not to have made much of this.