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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Arrow KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 6
source OSCH
type D
volume 77000B
material bunkers
dead
link

On February 4, 1970, at 0935, the steam tanker Arrow ran hard aground on Cerberus Rock in Chedabucto Bay off the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada. The vessel had been traveling off course at nearly full speed when the grounding occurred. The Arrow broke into two pieces on February 12, spilling between 77,000 and 82,500 barrels of Bunker C Oil into the waters of the bay. Visibility at the time of the grounding was between five and six miles, water temperatures were very cold and there was ice in the bays and inlets. There were high winds and seas at the time of the spill. This worked to spread the oil into Chedabucto Bay, and the oil eventually impacted approximately 300 kilometers of the bay's shoreline.

Bunker C fuel oil is a heavy product with an API gravity that ranges from 7 to 14. Oil near the spill site took the form of rainbow, silver and dull sheen. Oil was also visible in the water in the form of chunks, which were described as "the size of a hand towel, rolled lengthwise". Oil at the spill site was observed as a long narrow slick extending to the east. This pattern was seen usually during periods of calm or light winds. Oil moved under the influence of tides and currents and impacted the shoreline generally between the mid and high tide line. In some cases, the oil was driven above the high tide line by storms. In Chedabucto Bay, approximately 300 kilometers of shoreline were oiled ranging from a trace to very heavy coverage.


source MIT79
type D
volume 5000T
material
dead
link

Poor visibility, inoperable radar and unsuitable charts.


source Journal of Petroleum Technology, March, 1974
type A
volume
material
dead
link

Feb 4, 1979, Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia. The Liberian tanker Arrow, carrying 16,000 tons of Venezuelan Bunker C fuel oil went aground and broke up, spilling most of the oil into the bay. Several slicks formed and 190 miles of coastline was polluted. Water temperature 0 to 1C; air temperature much lower. Storm winds 40 to 50 mph. Severe wave condtions. Water depth about 100 ft.


source HOOKE
type A
volume 18000T
material F
dead
link

Extensive pollution was caused to local beaches when the Liberian steam tanker Arrow ran aground on Cerberus Rock in Chedabucto Bay, three miles offshore on the eastern coast of Nova Scotia in lat 45.27N, long 61.07W on February 4, 1970. Loaded at Amuay Bay with a cargo of 18,000 tons of bunker fuel oil for discharge at Port Hawkesbury, Cape Breton Island, the Arrow was abandoned by her crew as she became submerged from her No 7 cargo tank to the forward end. Oil began spewing from numerous ruptured tanks, creating a huge slick three miles long and 100 yards wide, which eventually polluted 40 miles of beach and shoreline. The wrecked vessel broke in two on February 8, the stern sinking four days later in continuing heavy seas.


source Environment Canada
type A
volume 108000BBLS
material F
dead
link

On Wednesday, February 4, 1970, amidst heavy rain and winds from the southeast reportedly gusting up to 60 knots, the Liberian tanker ARROW ran aground on Cerberus Rock in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia. She was under charter to Imperial Oil Limited and had been en route to Nova Scotia Pulp Limited with a cargo of 108,000 barrels of Bunker C fuel.

On grounding, the forward half of the ARROW suffered extensive damage, and oil began to flow from the ruptured tanks. Over the next 14 hours, much of this oil was transported to the shores north of Cerberus Rock by the prevailing winds and currents. As the storm moderated and the wind shifted, oil slicks, some miles in extent, were driven toward the south coast of the Bay. Some of the oil may have escaped from the Bay. On February 8, the ARROW broke in half at her No. 5 tank, the contents of which were thus spilled into the sea. Two days later the wind shifted from the northwest to the southeast and this oil in turn was driven toward the north shores of Chedabucto Bay. On February 12, the stern section sank in 90 feet of water carrying with it a good third of the cargo. The tanks containing this oil remained essentially intact, and very little oil was to escape from the stern section after it had settled to the sea bed.

Gale force winds from the east and later from the southwest moved more oil into the Inhabitants Bay, Janvrin Island, and Isle Madame areas. In the days following, oil moved toward the open sea. By the eighth day, February 12, an estimated one half of the ship's cargo of oil had been released and the calamity had reached catastrophic proportions. Out of the 375 statute miles of shoreline in the Bay area, 190 miles had been contaminated in varying degrees.


source CTX
type D
volume 77000B
material F
dead
link

Photos before the stern section sank, show the ship with very slight list to starboard, her forward section underwater, failing in sag in way of the forward house. This ship had a 3x9 tank arrangement.

This was an Onassis ship, the ex-Olympic Games. CTX does not know the source of the MIT79 comments.

Not in Cahill.