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SHIP NAME: Esso Glasgow KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source MITCHELL
type A
volume
material
dead
link

And on 3rd January 1967, Southhampton Water was the scene of a spectacular blaze following explosions on the Esso Glasgow as she lay berthed at Fawley. After the fire she moved to Husbands Shipyard at Southampton for temporary repairs, then moved to Wilton Fijenoord at Rotteeerdam for permanent repairs.


source VISSER
type A
volume
material D
dead 0
link www.aukevisser.nl/uk/id180.htm

On 4/1/1967 she caught fire after an explosion whilst berthed at No 2 jetty, Fawley refinery. The explosion occurred shortly before midnight as she was loading. There was a second explosion at 1.15 a.m. and several of the 160 firemen who fought the blaze were injured, though none seriously. No members of the crew were injured, although her Captain (H.W.Keeble) and 40 others had been on board at the time. The Port of Southampton was closed for the night as a precaution but reopened on 5/1/1967. Other vessels berthed nearby were moved away. There was no damage to the refinery or other facilities, nor any reported spillage of oil. The fire was extinguished by 3.45 a.m. Examination of the damage revealed that the explosion had occurred in No 6 centre tank, containing marine diesel oil, of which she had been loading four grades at the time. She had on board 11-12000 tons of diesel and had a further 3-4000 tons to load at the time of the incident. The damage report showed severe damage to Nos. 5,6 and 7 tanks and internal bulkheads and decking. There was a 3 feet deep split to No 6 port tank, which was exposed to the weather. After discharge of her cargo, she was moved to Cowes Roads on 6/1/1967 and then to Husbands Shipyard, Marchwood, Southampton on 9/1/1967 for temporary repairs to be carried out. She sailed to Rotterdam on 17/1/1967 for full repairs at the Wilton Fijenoord yard, arriving at Nieuwe Waterweg on 19/1/1967.

ESSO GLASGOW was the last of the nine wartime T2 tankers acquired by Esso to remain in the fleet, the others having been disposed of in the late 1950s and early 1960s. She owed her longevity to her conversion for coastwise operations in 1957. Her long and eventful career ended in 1971 when she was sold for scrap to Spanish shipbreakers at Bilbao, her duties having been taken over by new build tonnage. The decision to scrap her was announced in Lloyd`s List on 6/7/71, for the price of £17 per light ton displacement.


source VISSER
type A
volume 500T
material D
dead 0
link www.aukevisser.nl/uk/id364.htm

The mount of cargo lost that night amounted to about 500 tons gasoline and a few tons of heavy gas oil. For your information I was the Chief Officer on that night, and had just told all the watch who were on loading duties to go and get a cup of tea. Otherwise we would have been standing around 6 centre tank as that was the one that had just started loading. W. N. Connoll.


source CTX
type A
volume
material
dead 0
link

The second Visser site has a good picture of the damaged 6P/6C bulkhead. It is not a close up view, but the steel looks to be in good condition. We have no info on the source of ignition, but proper inerting would very likely have prevented this explosion.