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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Amphialos KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 4
source LINK
type D
volume Y
material
dead 2
link http://www.jproc.ca/athabee219/amphialo.html

This account focuses on the dramatic rescue of all but 2 of the crew by the Canadian cutterm Athabaskan. But it talks about extensive oil on the surface exhausting the Athabaskan's divers. That implies a thick slick. It also quotes the survivors as saying at 1800 on February 29, with no warning whatsoever, the forward section of their ship had broken away, and attempts to transmit a distress signal became impossible. A picture shows the stern high and the midship accommodation just about submerged, and a big slick.


source LINK
type D
volume
material
dead
link http://t2tanker.homelinux.net/ships/bulktrader.html

Broke in two in storm off Cape Cod on 1 March 1964. Bow sank immediately, stern sank while under tow on 5 March 1964.


source HOOKE
type D
volume
material
dead
link

The Liberian steam tanker Amphialos broke in two during a fierce Atlantic storm about 230 miles off the coast of Nova Scotia during the early hours of March 1, 1964. She had been on voyage from Aruba to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, loaded with crude oil when, according to the master, Captain Stamatis Polemis, the Amphialos started to break apart under the pounding of heavy seas and high winds. The 36 man crew had been scattered around the vessel but all managed to reach the stern section before she completely broke into two sections, separating just in front of the bridge. Captain Polemis later went on to say: "As soon as the bow broke away, the bridge dipped into the sea. The radio was useless because oil had poured into the radio cabin."


source CTX
type D
volume 30000LT
material
dead 3
link

For once Hooke's account is a little implausible. Not likely that any crew would be forward of the bridge in a bad storm at night.

This ship, built in 1949, was one of the ill-fated 30,000 dwt Bulkpetrol class, Her original name was Bulkstar, dwt 30,013, renamed Amphialos, 1963. This is the only one of the four losses, for which we have survivor accounts. This is

Could have been welding failure, or corrosion. But from the reported rapidity of the failure, and location. the most likely cause is welding. When the Bulkpetrol was built in 1948, she was the largest tanker ever built, and all welded ships were still a novelty.

We need Class records.