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Precis File
SHIP NAME: Tullahoma KEY: NUM. ENTRIES: 3
source USCG
type D
volume B
material C
dead 1
link

Collison with P and T Adventurer in fog off Washington, lat 47.38N, long 124.43W about 10 miles west of Destruction Island at about 0208 on 4 August 1951. Calm sea, fog, visibility about 0.5 miles. Adventurer at 14 or 15 knots detected at 5-6 miles went left. Tullahoma did not detect until about 1.5 miles went right. Adventurer struck Tullahoma on port side at forward end of poop deck at approximately 90 degree angle and "raked aft". One man was killed in his cabin.

the Adventurer's forepeak was pushed in some 20 feet, and the Tullahoma's hull had been penetrated 25 feet, in the vicinity of the break of the poop, between frames 41 and 45.


source SSC Report SR-1426
type A
volume
material
dead
link http://www.aoe.vt.edu/~brown/Papers/SSC_Report_SR_1426_Chapters.pdf

On August 4, 1951, the Victory cargo ship P+T Adventurer struck the T2 tanker Tullahoma at a reported 90 degree collision angle between frames 41 and 45 on the Tullahoma approximately 44.5 m aft of amidships. The reported vessel speeds at the time of the collision were 10 knots for the Tullahoma and 14 knots for the Adventurer causing a reported 25 feet of penetration and 20 feet of damage length. However, extensive examination of the documents related to the collision indicates that the actual speed of the Adventurer at the time of the collision was closer to 9.5 knots and the actual speed of the Tullahoma was approximately 8 knots.


source CTX
type D
volume Y
material
dead 1
link

Another Dance of Death. The USCG report does not mention a spill, so apparently the penetration was aft of the cargo tanks, but why no bunker spill?

This collision was studied by Brown et al in SSC Report SR-1426 using the SIMCOL model and finite element, both of which came up with DOP's and LOP's which were quite close to the reported values using 9.5 knots for the Adventurer, 8 knots for the Tullahoma, and a 90 degree angle.